Twin Peaks pilot sets the tone (Twin Peaks review, s01e01)

twin peaks opening scene

Take a deep breath and think of a nice calm river in the mountains, of machines softly whirring as they do their job exactly as they should, and of evergreen trees so big and full it looks like Christmas. Welcome to Twin Peaks, manufacturer of American dreams.

These images are the soothing pictures that open the show, only they don’t stay peaceful for long. Twin Peaks immediately introduces conflict before a scene even starts by the colors it uses in its opening credits. The words that flash across the screen, interrupting your view of a mountain range and river, are outlined in a neon green that clashes with the leafy forest greens. These outlined letters may as well be a flashing neon sign that says “turn back now.”

When the first scene begins, a beautiful woman in red lips looks at herself in the mirror as she gets ready in the morning. A white-haired man in red plaid gets ready to go fishing and touches his wife’s cheek before he leaves the house. On the edge of the picturesque setting where he sets off with his fishing pole is a bundle of white plastic. That pile of trash sticks out as much to this man as the neon green words in the title cards do to the viewer.

These visual cues add tension to Twin Peaks before any plot twist could. It’s signals like these that make it clear this isn’t going to be a carefree comedy, it’s going to be tense, weird, and full of contradictions.

After this man in the red coat sees that strange object on the shoreline, he drops his fishing gear and carefully walks toward it. The camera view shifts to his point of view as he rounds the corner and sees that the bundle of plastic is actually covering a dead body. This camera angle is markedly different from what has come before and makes it so the viewer isn’t just watching a character find a body, the viewer is actually the one who sees it first. Not only that, it zooms in—as if you lean in for a closer look.

By shifting to this point of view, Twin Peaks makes you feel like you are a part of this town and a part of this mystery. After all, you couldn’t walk away from finding a dead body, could you?

The camera only employs this point of view shot when it has to do with Laura Palmer, the murdered teenager who fuels the plot of the entire show. It makes her the center of your screen and the center of your mind.

When the sheriff comes to find the body he takes a long look—and the camera again shifts to a first person point of view. Everyone’s coats are buttoned up to their necks, including the two glamorous women looking on at the scene in oversized wool and fur coats. Everyone’s buttoned up jackets are because it’s cold, sure, but also because they are covering up secrets.

After Sheriff Harry S. Truman and Pete discover that the body is Laura Palmer, the show cuts to a woman calling for Laura. You already know that she won’t find her, so watching this woman walk through an empty house is painful and desperate. The camera shoots her from below as she runs up the stairs and across an empty floor, playing upon the horror of knowing what’s going to happen and not being able to look away. The angles formed by the staircase and banisters are crossing dynamically, creating more tension in the screen. For a moment, Laura’s mother walks off the screen entirely and the camera stays still on the empty house, echoing the silence she’s hearing in response to calling Laura’s name. As her mother enters Laura’s room, the camera again shifts to her point of view—because she’s looking for Laura—and pauses on an empty bed. Laura’s bed hasn’t been made—it’s as if she just got out of it. The bedspread has soft pink flowers that seem feminine and innocent. The romantic bedspread doesn’t match up with the image of a murdered girl wrapped up in hard, shiny plastic instead of soft cotton sheets.

Twin Peaks uses visual cues and contrasts like this throughout its run, and it’s what makes the show so rich and full of depth. Camera angles alone can elevate a scene so that the horror becomes almost unbearable to watch. When Laura’s mother, Sarah, can’t find Laura at home, she calls everyone she can think of to try to find where she is. She’s on the phone with her husband, Leland, when the sheriff comes to his work to tell him what happened to his daughter. A close up on Leland makes the pain in his face loom large. The camera zooms in on tragedy and isn’t afraid to look away. It filled the frame when Laura is found dead on the shore, when Leland finds out his daughter is dead, and again now when Laura’s mother starts screaming in pain as she overhears the news on the phone. A slow pan down the telephone cord that Leland drops reveals a hanging phone and Laura’s mother’s screams coming through the receiver loud and clear after Leland has walked away and there is no one on the other end to hear her.

It’s not just horror the show pulls off so well. One of my favorite jokes in the premier is when Audrey is introduced. The soundtrack plays a jaunty tune, and the camera pans down on a young girl in a soft pink sweater, plaid skirt, and saddle shoes walking to a chauffeured car. The camera takes a long pause on her shoes—which Audrey immediately changes when she gets to school. She throws those saddlebacks into her locker and replaces them with red pumps. Red heels belong to a troublemaking woman, not a teenage schoolgirl. Behind her locker, Laura’s best friends James and Donna talk about their day. Behind them, another student literally dances away from his locker, and behind him, a few cops walk into the school to investigate Laura’s death. Playfulness on Twin Peaks can only be paired with tragedy.

In another scene, Agent Dale Cooper and Sheriff Truman are in the morgue. They are in a windowless room standing over Laura’s body. The lights are flickering, as they so often do to set the tone in horror movies. “I have to apologize again for the fluorescent lights,” the medical examiner says. “I think it’s a bad transformer.”

Forget dreams, Twin Peaks is selling jokes mixed with waking nightmares.

Plot and characters can’t tell stories as rich as this on their own. In Twin Peaks, the set, camera, costumes, and editing all contribute to make a story that changed the way TV felt and looked, and the pilot managed to set the tone and build a world right away, with just a few key images.

To Do Lists of the Semi-Adult podcast: Episode 18

to do lists of the semi-adult

After some bananas technical difficulties I am finally able to post our newest podcast, even though it’s been out on iTunes, the podcast feed, etc., since last week, so you may have already seen it there.

Jewels and I love TV. Watching it, of course, but also talking about it, which is what this episode of the To Do Lists of the Semi-Adult is all about.

One of our favorite shows is Breaking Bad, even though it got so literally dark it became hard to see sometimes. We tried watching The Wire together in college and had to rewatch the first five episodes 100 times because we couldn’t tell what was going on. Years later I finished the series and liked it a lot, but man was it hard for me to get into.

A show I love is The Good Wife, mostly because I ship literally everyone on it with Alicia. (You can see more of why my fave new sport is shipping, here.) We both have watched and loved Grey’s Anatomy, and one of Jewel’s favorites shows is West Wing.

We grew up on Friends, and to me it is like comfort food–it’s so easy to jump back into when you need a fix. Though recently I saw a rerun of when Monica was with Richard, and I’m feeling like maybe she should have ended up with him instead of Chandler. Another comedy we both love is The Office, of course.

Twin Peaks is another favorite of mine (and it’s coming back to TV on Showtime!), and one of the reasons I love it so much is because it’s so artistic and visually different from anything else out there. That’s another reason I love Hannibal, which I’m reviewing this season for Just About Write, where I also talked about the gorgeous sets. I’m also reviewing Orange is the New Black, which we didn’t talk about, but it’s still really great!

In the lightning round, Jewels recently made this one-pot pasta dish, and I talk about the herbs we are growing in our apartment. If you have any herb-growing tips, let me know! Have a listen and let us know what your favorite shows are!

You can subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Stitcher or by using our feed link. You can also always find them on my Podcast page. You can find me right here at Rae’s Days, on Instagram, and on Twitter. Jewels is at Oven Lovin, on Instagram, and on Twitter.

To get more thoughts on things I’m reading/watching/loving, subscribe below to my newsletter, which will go out later today.

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reality mondays

I have been getting VERY into the Bachelor/Bachelorette, and I’m afraid there’s no turning back. I am so interested in what the show says about romance and gender roles, and I really feel for the people on the show–most of them, anyway. So when I saw a commercial for LIfetime’s new drama UnReal, a scripted show about the making of a reality dating show based on the Bachelor, I was hooked before the preview even finished. Lucky for me and you and everyone, UnReal airs right after the Bachelorette on Monday nights. So for three hours on Monday, I am in dramatic reality/really dramatic TV heaven.

Not only is it entertaining, it’s educational! Between the two shows I can finally piece together how real reality shows get made. Maybe. Probably.

So here’s what I learned this week:

the producers are right behind you
Both the Bachelorette and UnReal started with a breakdown. The Bachelorette picks up where it left off last week, with Kupah ranting and raving about how he doesn’t really even care about Kaitlyn but he doesn’t want to go home because they both like movie quotes??? He literally says there’s no connection between them and then gets mad that he can’t stay to continue to date her. (And this is a man on his best behavior, around people he just met and is trying to impress!)

During an interview on camera, Kaitlyn hears Kupah yelling and waving his arms around in a way I assume he thinks makes him look more manly (he is wrong). Kaitlyn, badass that she is, marches out to handle the situation. The camera follows her down the path and then comes across our loud, aggravated suitor–and a mysterious man in a purple blazer who jumps quickly out of the camera’s view.


I see you, producer.

I see you, and I see your work. Who knows what they said to Kupah to get him even more riled up and rant-y, but it worked. And did Kaitlyn go out there because of a little prodding, or because it was highly suggested to her?

UnReal suggests the latter. When producer Rachel comes back to work on a Bachelor-based reality show after having a breakdown on the finale of the last season, she jumps right back into the messy work of drumming up drama for TV. UnReal suggests that the cocktail meet and greets are a lot less fun than they end up looking. Most contestants stand around trying to talk to each other while waiting to get a few moments alone, but actually in front of a bunch of cameras, with the person they are all supposed to be dating. Plus, the producers are crawling around egging people on and manipulating every situation they can so that they can get the soundbites they need.

UnReal is a pretty dark look at what it takes to push people to breaking points for entertainment value. (And except for a tiny thing I have called compassion, I hate to say I think I’d be really good at this job.) The producers are watching and listening to everything, and they know what buttons to push to get the results they need. And they are probably standing just out of sight of every shot.

“It is not my fault that America is racist”
The Bachelor franchise is not exactly known for its diversity, and part of what set Kupah off was his supposed fear of being a token black person they keep around for a certain number of episodes. While it certainly looks like Kupah was sent home entirely for being an entitled jerk, UnReal makes it pretty clear that they don’t expect a person of color to make it to the final rose bracelet ceremony. A producer on UnReal blames this on America not wanting to watch it, but tell that to Empire’s audience, or Black-ish, or How to Get Away with Murder, or Scandal or…. The contestants are entirely chosen by the producers, and UnReal makes it look like they have a large part in steering at least the first few rounds of who stays and who goes. So if anyone wants to look at the real cause of its lack of diversity, they should start with the people putting on the show.

I’m already learning a lot about a (mostly not true) reality show by watching a (definitely nonfiction) behind-the-scenes drama and I can’t wait to learn more (possibly real) facts next week.

There will be a newsletter going out later today on other things I’m watching/reading/loving, so if you haven’t signed up yet, give it a shot by signing up below!

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some housekeeping

Hello! Just wanted to drop a quick note on a few site changes. I updated the look of and also updated some of the backend. If you subscribe, you should hopefully still get posts the way you used to, but please let me know if there’s any issues and I’ll see what I can do. If you want to get Rae’s Days posts delivered straight to your inbox, you can enter your email on the right in the box under “Subscribe to Blog Via Email.”

I also send a newsletter every week or so. To sign up, you can go to the box on the right of the site and enter your email under “Subscribe to Rae’s Newsletter.” Here’s a taste of this week’s, which went out yesterday:

coolest girl in the clique

 T Swift came out with a new video on Sunday for Bad Blood, the not so thinly veiled story of her soured relationship with Katy Perry. I had hoped Tay would be the villain in this one, but instead she is betrayed by her long-time bestie Selena Gomez. To retaliate, Taylor gets together all her badass super friends who look good in leather to fight with her. The coolest girl in this battle of cool girls is def Cara Delevingne, Victoria’s Secret Angel, model, and actress. She is the only one who masters the look of being so cool she doesn’t even care what happens with these nunchucks, probably because she in fact does not really care about this video. She knows she looks good, so she doesn’t sweat the rest of it. (A close second in coolness is Zendaya, who throws a knife through a teddy bear and has legs for days.) I can hardly keep up with Taylor’s best friend hierarchy, I can’t imagine trying to be (and stay) in it.

most middle school

Even though the most popular girl in school posted pictures of all her friends at a party you weren’t invited to and called it a music video, the most horrific middle school call back this week was on the Bachelorette. In the worst twist so far (I’m sure more will come), the dating show where a woman got to be in charge of oodles of men trying to win her affection became a show where two women were competing for the attention of 25 men. The producers supposedly couldn’t decide who to pick as the next Bachelorette, romantic Britt or hilarious Kaitlyn, so they are letting the men contestants vote for who they want to date. So instead of seeing a woman get lavished in attention and command the room and her own future, we saw two women go head to identically hair-styled head to win prom queen. And, sorry, but winning the chance to date 25 24 guys, half of whom wanted to date someone else, does not seem like a grand prize to me. But that won’t stop me from tuning in to find out who the bachelorette will be. (I’m firmly #teamkaitlyn) [ed note: This aired last night, and it’s Kaitlyn! PHEW.]

In an unexpected twist last night one contestant was sent to Chris Harrison as if he were about to get grounded and was asked to leave the show for being a sloppy, rude drunk and–most importantly–not showing up “for the right reasons.” Roughly 5-10 other men jumped at the chance to confront him and save the women from his antics, but they were unfortunately allowed to stay.

Thanks for your patience as I made some changes! And thanks always for reading and keeping me company on the internet, I truly appreciate it.

fashion illustration of claire on outlander

claire from outlander illustration

Much of Outlander’s attention right now is because of its super hot sex scenes with the main couple, Claire and Jamie. But there is just as much to talk about when the characters have their clothes on.

Terry Dresbach, the shows costume designer, talks here about eight of her favorite looks on the show. Not surprisingly, Claire is on that list four times. I drew her in one of my favorite looks of hers, a gorgeous deep teal bodice and plaid skirt.

Claire has so many different looks on the show, but they are only made up of a few different items mixed and matched. The idea is that Claire has limited clothing given to her, and she wears those items over and over in different combinations.

I could learn a lesson or two from Claire on how to mix it up with a smaller wardrobe, and on how to wear a bodice like a boss.

Here’s a video on some of my coloring process.

outlander s1e14: the search


Jamie is missing. For a girl who turns in mostly to see Claire and Jamie be in love, I wouldn’t have bet an episode with only one half of this couple would be this entertaining. But on her search for her husband, Claire tries on many different identities, and the show flirts with many different genres, to do whatever it takes to get what she needs.

With Jamie missing, and Ian missing his leg, Claire and Jenny are the only two who can feasibly go look for their missing laird. So the pair sets off on horseback, Jenny with a pistol on her back.

Just as I was wondering what women back then did when they were lactating, and just as I was about to roll my eyes at a new mother going on a trip (on horseback!) without any discomfort with her body, Jenny addressed the issue in the most straightforward way possible.

In an 18th century version of pumping, Jenny squeezed her breastmilk into a cup to relieve herself. And just like that, a normal occurrence for so many women was portrayed matter of factly on TV. Huzzah!

I would SO WATCH a show of just Claire and Jenny being outlaws. (Or maybe a reality show, Survivor: The Scottish Highlands–they aren’t here to make friends.) They are both headstrong and fiery, and they both have deep hearts and survivalist instincts. They push each other, and their skills and personalities complement each other so well that it’s a blast to watch. I pity the person who gets in their way–they both made it very clear they would do whatever it takes to get Jamie home.

After they take a courier at gunpoint and torture him for information, Claire first decides to bandage him up when they are done with him. But Jenny knows that if the soldier returns to his men, he will tell them about Jamie, putting them all at risk. As Claire struggles with the idea of killing this man, Murtagh, sent by Ian, arrives and does the deed for them, before calmly walking off to find them something to cook for dinner. Problem solved, I guess?

One of the standout moments on this episode full of so many is when Murtagh returns to Claire and Jenny after hunting for dinner. Murtagh offers the animal to each of them to prepare it to cook, but he should have known Claire and Jenny cook no man’s dinner they don’t want to. The side eye they give him is UNREAL.

Murtagh is such a delight, which was a lovely surprise since I couldn’t remember his name until this very episode. When Jenny heads back to Lallybroch to care for her newborn daughter, Murtagh comes up with a plan for he and Claire to lure Jamie out of hiding in the countryside.

Which is when we get to the Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman portion of the show. Murtagh and Claire travel from town to town calling as much attention to themselves as possible so word of mouth will spread that an English healer and a Fraser clansman dancer (just go with it) are in the area. When Jamie hears of the beautiful English healer, he will know it’s Claire and he will come to them.

Claire is no stranger to trying on different identities to make herself useful and to keep herself alive. Becoming a healer is what saved her when she first went back in time, and she returns to this tactic now, searching for Jamie.

But they abandon the healing part of the plan pretty quickly when Claire comes up with a catchy song for Murtagh to use in his dancing act. Only Murtagh wants Claire to sing it instead. And they have to change the words, he says, because what Scot in the 1700s would know what a Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy is, anyway.

So Claire changes her identity again and dons a sort of gypsy pantsuit (they’ll get more attention if a lass dresses up like a lad, according to Murtagh), and she sings on every stage she can. The song become so popular, in fact, that a group of gypsies steal the act for themselves. (And here we are all of a sudden in a show about a broadway musical with rival singers trying to upstage each other.)

This reminds me of how my friends and I have often talked about how we would know if someone polyjuice potions us–what’s the one fact that only you and your friend could know?–but now I’m thinking we also need a plan for how to covertly get each other’s attention if we were on enemy grounds. Murtagh uses the lyrics of a song that he knows Jamie will recognize. I can’t think of any situation where I would know my loved ones were calling out to me in code.

But this song works so well that not only Jamie knows it’s a signal, so does Dougal MacKenzie. (I mean really, did the MacKenzies decide on this song being a code in a clan meeting?)

When Claire gets a message to meet at Glenrowan Cross, she rushes off hoping to find Jamie. Imagine her disappointment when she sees it’s Dougal instead.

Dougal is a worm, but his scene with Claire is wonderful because she drops (almost) all her acts in her last-ditch desperate plan to get Jamie back. Dougal tells Claire that Jamie has been captured, and he’s due for hanging any day now. In a super sleazeball move, Dougal then proposes to Claire under the pretense of keeping her safe after Jamie is gone. Claire sees his marriage proposal for what it is, a play to get the Fraser’s land. Her sharp wit and disgust at Dougal’s tactics come through loud and clear, as does her love for Jamie. This is Claire’s true heart. She is not only a healer or a wanderer, she is a tough, smart woman who does what she needs to survive and help those she loves. Claire is not acting or pretending with Dougal; she is her fiercest self.

After she comes up with a plan to help Jamie, Claire plays one more role as the Laird’s Lady begging for the MacKenzies to help her break Jamie out of prison. They agree, and set off, outlaws once more.

taylor swift’s bad blood music video poster

taylor swift
This morning Taylor introduced us to Catastrophe, the main character in her new video for Bad Blood, premiering May 17, the day of the Billboard Music Awards.

Her makeup is on point in an exaggerated cat eye and a deep part I wish she’d wear more often. I assume she is wearing a red lip because of course she is.

Although Tay plays the good girl/victim in many of her songs (she is the leading lady in her own life, after all), a smokey eye + black leather does not seem like it portrays the innocent friend wronged by the doublecrosser in Bad Blood. For that matter, the name Catastrophe isn’t exactly sweet and docile either.

So what if Tay is going to be the bad guy in this video??? I’d love to see her play with a little more edge in her storytelling and her looks (more leather, Taylor!), so I hope that’s what we see in a few weeks.(Let’s also hope this video is more exciting than the boring, if somewhat dreamy, Style, am I right?)

We all know Taylor is a good girl, her sweet style and numerous documented kindnesses tell us so. Going edgier could be risky for her image, but surely telling wider stories would also stretch her skills. Plus her reputation is so cemented and her fans so loyal, I don’t know that anything would knock her off her pedestal. So experiment away, Taylor!

met gala 2015 aka the year of rihanna


RIHANNA. We have to start here and end here and return to here because this is jaw-dropping, icon-making fashion. THIS is what the Met Ball is for. Celebs can wear the pretty, safe boring things they always wear the rest of the year. The Met Gala is for turning fashion up to 11, it’s for celebrating and honoring the beauty and craftsmanship and risk taking that puts dresses in a museum, right next to the Michelangelos and Picassos.

The gala raises money for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute–the fashion exhibit is always my favorite part of any museum–and the theme was China: Through the Looking Glass.

The Met Gala, more than any other red carpet event, is solely about the fashion. For the Oscars, the fashion is a treat, but it exists because of movies, and the stars of the show are the humans in the dresses. The stars of the Met Gala are the dresses themselves.

If I ran the world, anyone who played it safe at the Met Gala wouldn’t be invited back. (Simple is different than boring, don’t forget.) For those of us sitting at home who may never see art like this close up, much less wear it ourselves, this night every year is a gift. If you are able to go and have one of these incredible designers dress you, you should feel responsible for bringing fashion to the public and for showcasing this art.

Rihanna did that, with her queenly Guo Pei. One of the few who actually wore a Chinese designer, she not only elevated fashion, she looked like she was having a blast taking up the entire red carpet. Who else could put that on and not be swallowed up by that train or overwhelmed by that embroidery? It’s a perfect gown (coat? dress? dream?), and it was worn by the perfect person to pull it off.

rihanna met gala

There were other risk-takers last night, but also a few too many celebs who stuck to their usual. Kim, Bey, and J Lo met afterwards to found the Bejeweled Banging Body Club, I assume. (J Lo is president, obvs.) Reese Witherspoon stuck to the simple sheath she wore all awards season, and Sophia Vergara wore another sweetheart strapless gown. They looked great, but I’ve seen it all before.

keri russell

Keri Russell (one of my personal style icons for her chic, edgy simplicity) was able to wear a gown that fits her style while upping the intensity in a stunning greenish black (or blackish green) Altuzarra. She kept her look simple (not boring) with limited accessories. I bet this dress was incredible close up, with the changing colors and feather details. I love feathers on clothes but I can’t imagine they would ever be practical in real life–which is perfect for the Met Gala. I might also be partial to this because it reminds me of my favorite McQueen.

fan bingbing

Fan BingBing wore another Chinese designer, Christopher Bu, and she nailed it in a gold dress and emerald cape. She is on theme and on point, from the larger sequins on her dress to her perfect lipstick and earrings, to a cape that is anything but cliche.

I am happy to say that it’s been a wild ride. Until next year, you crazy kids.

outlander s1e13: the watch

jamie from outlander the watch

Jamie, Claire, and their in-laws face one near miss after another in this episode, spinning their wheels and ending up almost exactly where they started–plus or minus one baby.

Jamie is introduced to the Watch–a Scottish highlands version of the mob–in the most Jamie way possible: being held at gunpoint. He escapes death after some quick thinking from Jenny, when she lies and says he is her cousin who dropped in for an unannounced visit.

When Jamie’s not facing the barrel of a gun in this episode, he and his family are narrowly escaping death, imprisonment, and blowing Jamie’s cover. (Which should be a lot more exciting than it was.)

Jenny and Jamie almost get away with their lie, but the leader of the Watch Taran MacQuarrie knows their story doesn’t add up, and his suspicions are confirmed when Horrocks arrives and recognizes Jamie.

Horrocks demands a bribe to keep Jamie’s identity a secret and not turn him over to the Redcoats, and he alllllmost gets his money, until Ian stabs his sword straight through him.

Ian and Jamie almost get away with killing Horrocks, until the Watch notices he’s missing, but his horse isn’t. As Ian is just about to confess, Jamie jumps in to take the blame himself, gambling by telling the almost truth to Taran, who ends up impressed with his killer instinct.

While the men are figuring out who killed who and how to go on a raid, Jenny and Claire are also dealing with life-and-death matters as Jenny goes into labor.

Claire tells Jenny the baby is breech, and they almost get help–until they find out the midwife has been called away to tend to a sick family member.

Jenny is in labor for hours and is worried she will die in childbirth. Claire almost tells Jamie and Ian that Jenny is in trouble against Jenny’s wishes, but she doesn’t. She does, however, tell Jamie that she thinks she is infertile and may not be able to give him the son or daughter he is planning on.

Jamie reacts shockingly well to this news, assuring her that maybe it’s for the best and he couldn’t bear to see her during the pain of pregnancy and childbirth. (But the emotional pain of not being able to have kids if you want them is ok or something? On that note, does Claire even want kids? About two episodes ago she was ready to go back to the 1940s.)

Jamie and Ian are invited (well, forced mostly) to go on a raid with the Watch while Jenny is still in labor. Ian almost stays with Jenny–but then he doesn’t. And because men have nothing to do whatsoever with getting pregnant or giving birth or raising kids, Jenny tells the men to leave them alone to deal with this nasty business of bringing new life into the world, but to come back safe.

Which they almost do. Jamie realizes the raid is a trap a little too late, and only Ian makes it home to the women. In some of the only action that sticks this week, Jamie has been captured by the British, yet again.

I’m pumped for next week, when it looks like Claire and Jenny turn into a crime fighting outlaw duo. Hopefully that will have more action and more fun.

vanessa on daredevil

vanessa from daredevil

Vanessa on Daredevil went on a date with the devil himself. When Wilson Fisk, the evil mastermind rebuilding Hell’s Kitchen in his vision, takes her to a dinner that gets interrupted by a haggard-looking criminal yelling at Fisk, Vanessa realizes this might not be your average businessman. So on their next date, Vanessa brings a gun. Later that night, they watch the city burn, together.

Vanessa on Daredevil is the baddest B on TV right now.

Vanessa is choosing to get into bed with evil–she doesn’t have to be tricked into it or lied to about it or caught by a trap. She really sees Fisk, and she can tell he isn’t on the level. She chooses to be with him not in spite of this, but because of it. This is a huge contrast with other superhero shows where men hide their misdeeds with tiny bandanas over their eyes, or where everyone is making decisions on women’s behalf while they have no say in the matter.

Another superhero show, Arrow, spent a verrrrrry long time with whip smart Thea not realizing her brother was missing all the same nights the Arrow was crime fighting. And that they kind of looked alike under that hood. And that a vigilante’s team was operating *in the basement of a business she owned*.

Oliver claimed he was hiding his identity as the Arrow to protect Thea, but Thea has faced plenty of tragedy and has fought back, learning how to fight and be a warrior herself. She is self-sufficient, and she runs her own business and she’s good at it. She is the opposite of an incapable person who can’t be in charge of her own life.

What Oliver is really protecting is himself, so he won’t have to have an awkward conversation where he shows his real self to someone he loves. It’s true that it’s hard to be vulnerable, but it’s also true that watching a man lie to a woman so he can stay comfortable doing whatever he wants is a snooze and a half.

The Flash is another show that has been tons of fun, except when a certain woman is involved. It seems like everyone in Central City–and Starling City!–knows that Barry Allen is the Flash, but Iris, who has grown up with Barry and is a professional reporter covering the Flash, can’t figure it out? I mean, the Flash is the exact size and shape of the guy you are secretly in love with and you never once daydreamed that ~maybe~ they were the same person?

It doesn’t make sense! And worse than that, every man in Iris’ life has an opinion on what Iris should know and when, and none of them have included Iris in the conversation. Keeping women out of the loop comes from a misguided, sexist sense of protection (from what, exactly?), but all it does is keep women on the fringe of the story, outside and powerless. And on the Flash, it’s keeping Iris stuck in one place while everyone else speeds ahead and leaves her behind.

But Iris won’t be in the dark forever, just like Oliver couldn’t keep lying to Thea. And hopefully these weak plots to maintain the status quo and hold off the inevitable will give way to richer stories for all of the characters.

Vanessa is exciting because she makes her own choices, and she creates her own power. Sure, Fisk runs Hell’s Kitchen, but Vanessa runs Fisk. When Fisk wants to protect Vanessa and send her out of the country, she says no thank you. She has power and agency in their relationship, and it comes from being on the inside, seeing Fisk when he’s vulnerable, and then using that information to make her own decisions.

vanessa and fisk

It’s so much more interesting to watch a woman choose to stay when things get hard, and know she’s getting involved with a man who does bad things, rather than yet again see a woman who happens to fall into a situation based on everyone else’s choices but her own.

And if it’s all the good guys who are lying? I’d rather be a bad bitch, too.